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Monday, June 11, 2012

Pollyanna - (1960) English Subtitle - Pollyanna - Phụ đề Tiếng Anh







- Now, boy, I've told you time and again.
- Now, listen to me. There's no horsing around when the train's coming.
- Do you hear me? Now, go on, get away.
-  Looks like she's on time. - Yes, she is.
- Harrington!
- Let me help you with that, little girl. -Thank you. -Watch your step.
- Watch your step. There you are, little girl.
- So I have to go to the store. You go get the luggage. Be careful of the fresh eggs.
-  They're wrapped in paper. - Yes, dear. - Ben?
-  Yes, dear? - I want you to write a letter to the president of this railroad.
- There were men smoking in the parlour car. Disgraceful!
-  I've taken his number. - Yes, dear.
-  Miss Pollyanna? - Yes? Aunt Polly?
- No, I'm Nancy. I work for your aunt and I came here to fetch you.
- Oh. How do you do?
-  This is Mr Thomas, the gardener. - How do you do?
- Hello, young lady.
- Oh, no, no, no. Thomas will take that for you.
- Oh. Put it in the back seat. Oh, good afternoon, Mrs Tarbell.
-  Is that Jenny Harrington's child? - Yes, it is.
- Doesn't look a thing like any of the Harringtons. What's your name, girl?
-  Speak up. - Pollyanna Whittier, ma'am.
- Well, you're a very fortunate little girl.
- Most children who have lost their parents would end up in an orphanage.
-  You know that, don't you? - Yes, ma'am.
- Well, thank your lucky stars for such a good woman as your aunt taking you in.
-  Yes, ma'am. - Yes.
- Well, see that you're properly appreciative and don't cause any trouble.
-  Children really never realize--  Ed?
-  Uncle Karl! - Much too long.
-  It's good to see you. - Oh, same here. How's everything at the house?
- Wait till Polly Harrington hears about this!
- Right up here in the back seat, honey. There you are.
- Nancy, what are you staring at?
- Oh, nothing! Nothing at all, sir.
-  Think she'll want the car? - I don't know if she wants the car or not.
- You'll have to ask her yourself.
- Your aunt's waiting for you, miss.
- Hurry up. I haven't got all day!
- Oh, Mr Thomas. Please put that here.
- All right, Nancy. All right.
- You wait here, miss, and don't touch anything.
-  Do you understand? - Yes, ma'am.
- Well, we had, uh, Matthew.
-  Mark last week. - Isaiah has some very good passages.
-  Isaiah? - Yes, that's more what I had in mind.
-  Yes, Isaiah has some very good passages. - What is it, Nancy?
- Oh, excuse me, ma'am. The little girl is here.
- All right, show her in.
- What you've been waiting for.
- About the sermon, Reverend.
- Yes.
- Now, the transiency of life...
- that-that fleeting, ephemeral vapour...
- it appeareth and it vanisheth-- James, the New Testament.
- The perishability of our mortal bodies.
- You want me to-- to weave a theme of this into my sermon?
-  Well, let me tell you what my father said to Reverend Moffet. - Yes. What did he say?
- He said that you only have the congregation for one short hour a week.
- And there are six long days of mischief for them before you get them again.
- Aha! I see your point.
- Strike hard on Sunday the excessiveness of God's wrath and hope they carry it with them a few days into the week.
-  Exactly what I mean. - Oh, yes, yes.
- Well, come in, young lady.
- Let's meet each other properly.
-  I'm your Aunt Polly. - How do you do?
- This is the pastor of our church, Reverend Ford.
- How do you do? Well, there's a family resemblance.
- She looks very much like her mother.
- Mother always used to say I look like you!
- Would you be good enough to stand erect and in a proper manner, please?
- And where in the world did you get that dress?
- It came in the missionary barrels.
-  Missionary barrels? - Yes. Her father was a minister.
- As a matter of fact, he was a missionary in the British West Indies.
- Pollyanna, this is going to be your new home...
- and I hope you'll be very happy with me.
- I'm very sorry about the dress, Aunt Polly.
- My father said it was a size too big...
- but that I should be glad it wasn't a pair of boys' trousers.
- Well, that's hardly anything to be glad about.
- Well, my father always used to say that people--
- Yes, well, never mind what your father used to say.
- Supper is at six sharp, and no one is ever late for meals at this house.
-  Yes, ma'am. - Nancy will show you your room.
- I'm very glad you sent for me, Aunt Polly.
- Your home is very lovely.
- Well, thank you.
- It must make you awfully glad.
-  Glad? - That you're so very rich!
- Honestly!
-  Did I say something wrong? - Well, let's just say...
- there are about sixty-eleven things you could have said besides that.
- I run a clean kitchen. No shenanigans in here.
- And you clean up after yourself, you hear me?
- Yes, ma'am.
-  You sure it was Doc Chilton? - Mrs Tarbell saw him first!
- Coming back after all these years! D-Does she know yet?
-  Old blabbermouth Tarbell will see to that. - Yeah.
- Now, mind what you're doing and don't spill your milk. Now, come along.
-  You hurry up and change your clothes and get back here. I need your help. - All right, all right.
-  And if you see Angelica, tell her to come down here too. - Okay.
-  Leaving me all alone here. - I'm very pleased to have met you, Mrs Lagerlof.
-  Mmm. - Now come along.
- Hello.
-  What's his name, please? - His name happens to be Elizabeth.
- Oh! You're a girl!
-  You're lovely. - Now, leave her alone and come along.
- How-- How do I address you, please?
- Well, just call me Nancy, same as everybody else.
- Oh. And this is Angelica. She's the upstairs maid.
-  How do you do? - Psst! Psst!
- At the back porch. You know who.
- Now? Oh, for heaven's sake.
- Oh, Angie, would you show her to her room, please?
-  Well, I still have two rooms left to do. - I'll help you with the bedrooms in the morning.
-  All right, just this once. - Come on. Come on.
- Will you get out of here? Come on. Hurry up. I've got work to do. Now, come on and get up here.
- I turn my back for one moment, and what do you do? You disappear.
-  And don't spill that milk. - Yes, ma'am.
-  I just got through cleaning up this hall. - Yes, ma'am.
-  What are you doing now? - Who lives in all these?
- There's no one lives in them. They're just there.
-  What for? - That's what being wealthy is.
- You sure are a question-asker, aren't you?
- Now, hurry up.
- Come on, come on. Don't dawdle.
-  Well, what's the matter? - Nothing.
- Oh! Stuffy!
- Not much of a room, is it?
- But it's my own anyway. I'm glad of that.
- Ooh, and the bed's soft.
- And it's got a lovely window.
- Who's that man down there with Nancy?
- None of your business.
- Just make sure you're dressed in time for dinner.
- You'd think she'd do better than this for her own niece.
- Almighty God, we thank thee for thy bounty.
- Grant unto us the grace ever to live in dread of thee.
- And bless this food unto our nourishment that it may strengthen us...
- to do thy will in all things.
- Amen.
- Oh, I'm sorry.
- Nancy, would you bring another glass of milk, please?
- Yes, ma'am.
- My-My clumsy old hand.
- Well, now, there's no harm done.
-  Did you find your room satisfactory? - Oh, yes. It's very nice. Thank you.
- You hadn't mentioned it, so I just wondered.
- I've never had a whole room to myself before.
- I must be higher up in the house than anyone, aren't I?
- Well, I'm not used to children's noises around the house...
- and that's the reason I chose that one.
- Oh, I'm-- I love it. I really do.
- Really!
- Aunt Polly?
- Do you ever have steak and ice cream?
- Are you complaining about the food?
- Oh, no! It's delicious!
- I just wondered.
- I love steak.
- Father always used to say that if we ever had the money you have...
- we'd have steak and ice cream three times every day!
- Pollyanna, I think we ought to get one thing straight right now.
- I don't want you constantly quoting what your father used to say.
- Do you understand?
- Nancy, I thought I made myself clear about gentlemen callers.
-  Ma'am? - Now, don't pretend you don't understand me.
- I saw you and George Dodds out in the summer house.
-  George has been every inch a gentleman with me, and it's not--  We won't discuss it.
- If you want to remain on my staff, I don't want you to see him any more.
-  Do you understand? - Yes, ma'am.
- This is no concern of yours.
- You can finish your supper, Pollyanna.
- In the fall, I'll introduce you to Mr Bainbridge.
- He's the principal of our school, and he'll decide what grade you're to be in.
- Pollyanna, I think we should talk about you and your position in this community.
- Do you know why it's called Harrington Town?
- My mother said it was named after my grandfather.
- That's right.
- And everyone in this town looks to us to set a good example...
- in the way we conduct ourselves, in our duties and manners...
- in what we think and even what we say.
- So we must be good examples for everyone in everything we do.
-  Is that clear? - Yes, Aunt Polly.
- Just remember our family position and conduct yourself properly and modestly.
- Oh. You mean what I said before?
- I understand that now. I'll never say that again.
-  You understand what? - About the money.
- I'm not supposed to be glad we're so very rich, huh?
- Well, uh, I think it's time for you to get ready for bed, young lady.
-  May I kiss you good night? Please? - What?
- Kiss you?
- I love you, Aunt Polly.
- Uh, just a moment, please. Come back here.
- Turn around once.
- That dress is disgraceful.
- Tomorrow we'll go into town and get you some decent clothes.
-  Store-bought? - But of course.
- Where else would we get them?
- Out of an actual store? New clothes?
- Well, you're a Harrington now, and I want you to look like one.
- Yoo-hoo!
- Pollyanna?
- Walk up the stairs like a lady, please.
- Store-bought clothes!
- What do you think of that, Elizabeth?
- I wonder if she meant new petticoats too.
- And new garters and stockings and underpants.
- Don't tell anyone...
- but it's wonderful to be so rich, isn't it?
- Nancy, something's come up. I'm going with Mrs Tarbell.
-  Would you please take Pollyanna home? - Yes, madame.
- Oh, I'll take that box, Pollyanna.
- Now, get into the car, miss.
- Oh, Pollyanna. Will you please get into the car? We've simply got to get home!
- Oh!
- George, stop it!
- Oh, Pollyanna, you don't know my cousin Fred, do you?
-  Your cousin Fred? - This is Pollyanna Whittier.
- Miss Harrington's niece. The one who's come to live with her.
- Oh. Oh, that one.
- Hello, Pollyanna. How are you, honey?
-  Fine, thank you. - Good.
- Well, uh, how about this? Running into you after all these--
-  What's it been, six years? Say, how's your ma and pa? - Well, they're just fine.
- You know, Pollyanna, I don't take too much to relatives.
- But this girl here, she was always just like a sister to me.
-  I tell ya, I love this cousin. - Will you cut it out?
- Uh-huh. Well, look, uh, what are you girls doin'?
- How'd you like to go down the street and get a great big dish of ice cream?
-  Huh? - Oh!
- Oh, no, that's a rotten idea. She probably hates ice cream, doesn't she?
-  Oh, probably. - Who, me?
-  Oh, no. I love it! - Really?
- You do? Well, now, isn't that astounding?
- How'd you ever develop a taste for that awful stuff?
- Oh, no, really! I really do love it. I--
- Well, I know a wonderful place. Come on, girls.
- Follow old cousin Fred to the land of strawberry frappe.
- Unless you'd rather go down the street and have a beer.
- You're funny.
- Hey, you two, get down off that truck right now.
- How many times did I tell you to keep away from the fire engine?
- Hey, get on, there! Go on! I'm not gonna tell you again. Now, get off that ladder.
- You-You see? Right up there under the eaves?
- Just beyond the window is where--  How'd it happen?
- Oh, the pipes busted, Mayor. Both them boilers went up at the same time.
-  And before we knew it, we was up to our necks in water. - Mr Geary!
-  Uh, comin'. Excuse me. - Well, the children are safe, thank goodness.
- I warned you about this and told you we should do something.
-  Now, perhaps, you'll listen. - I've asked everyone...
- to meet at my house, and we'll discuss this calmly.
- A fine orphanage this is! Water pipes busting all over the place.
- Oh, Dr Chilton? Doctor, could you have a look at Mr Geary's arm?
-  Oh, just scalded it a bit. - Of course.
-  Is there a dispensary here? - Yes, Doctor. This way.
- I wonder what's going on.
- Listen, miss, before we go in...
- it might be just as well not to mention...
- about the ice cream to your aunt.
- My father told me never to tell a lie.
- Pollyanna...
- I didn't mean to tell a lie.
- But there's no reason to bring up the subject if it isn't mentioned.
-  I mean, about cousin Fred and all. - I like your cousin Fred very much.
- Oh, he's all right, I guess.
- He's very handsome, and he has a nice smile.
- But there's something sort of...
- I don't know, funny about him.
- What do you mean, funny?
- I know what it is. It's his name.
-  He doesn't look at all like a Fred. - What?
- He looks more like a George to me.
- Pollyanna! Wait a minute.
-  Pollyanna, I told you to come directly home. - Yes, I know, but--
- And know that when I tell you to do something, you must do it.
- There are rules-- Nancy, where have you two been? It's almost  :.
- Well, uh, you see, ma'am--
- Have you been carrying on with George Dodds again?
-  Oh, it was my fault, Aunt Polly. - What do you mean, your fault?
- Well, I-I just dawdled so.
- It was the excitement of the new dress, I suppose.
- Polly, before Karl Warren get's here, we must talk.
- Oh, I suppose you're right. Nancy?
- Nancy, get into your uniform and help with the luncheon.
-  Yes, ma'am. - And this is no place for you, young lady.
-  We have lots to do, so run along. - Yes, Aunt Polly.
- I'm sorry to start your vacation off like this, Ed, but this won't take long.
- Don't worry about me, Uncle Karl. I'll just wait out here.
- Fine. Fine.
- Oh, Frieda, Bessie, they're waiting for you in the conservatory.
- Right in there, ladies.
- Why, Edmond. This is a surprise.
-  Well, if it isn't young Dr Chilton. - Mrs Tarbell.
-  I'll see if everyone's ready for you, Polly. - Thank you.
- It's nice to see you again. Are you just visiting?
- Well, I thought it was time for vacation, the first one in five years.
- I'm just waiting here for Karl. I won't be in the way here, I hope.
- No, no, of course not.
- Seems strange, being back here again like this.
- Polly, they're all ready for you.
- I'll be right there.
-  Why don't you come in and join us? - No, I'd rather not butt in.
- I'll wait here.
-  Well, they're waiting for me. - Go ahead.
- I'll be fine here.
-  Hi, Nancy! - Hi. You better get out of here.
- Oh, I'm all right.
- It should be parliamentary procedure, same as it's always been.
-  Well, for once, let's have facts. - We always observe regular procedure.
- Oh, bunkum! We're here because of an emergency.
-  Everybody will be talking at the same time. - Exactly!
-  Hello. - Hello.
-  Is this the town meeting? - Oh, no. It's in there.
- In the conservatory, for heaven's sake. -Oh.
- Are you a member of the ladies aid group?
- Oh, no. I'm just a child.
- I'm not even supposed to be here.
-  What's your name? - Pollyanna Whittier.
- That's my aunt over there, the pretty one.
- This is her house, and I live with her.
- Wait just a moment, everybody. We'll compromise.
-  We'll go to the immediate problems first. - Good.
- Amelia, wouldn't you like to hear what Karl has to say?
- All I'm saying is that it's time we took some pride in that orphanage...
- and put up a decent, presentable building that we could all be proud of.
- That's all I'm saying, and I've been saying it...
- for three and a half long years!
- Polly, he is completely out of line on the whole thing.
- If we'd all be a little more quiet, cooperative, orderly.
- If we'd all stop shouting and cooperate--
- There is nothing wrong with that building! All it needs is new plumbing.
- Today the plumbing, tomorrow the roof and the Lord knows what--
- Excuse me, Reverend. Who knows what's gonna happen next?
- You were very happy when my father donated the building for the town.
- Oh, for Pete's sake, Polly Harrington, listen to reason.
- It's a dilapidated old relic!
- The dining hall, the dispensary.
- Even my nephew, Dr Chilton there, he noticed that.
- Ed, tell them what you said.
- Well, I don't think I should say anything.
- No, no. Now, come on. Tell them what you said. I want them to hear it.
- Well, I got a look at the dispensary when I fixed Mr Geary's arm.
- And I mentioned it seemed a little inadequate for  children there.
- There you are. Now you've heard it.
- We all thank you for your interest, Edmond, but it's an equipment problem.
- We're talking about Harrington House, which is a landmark in this town...
- and I intend to see that it stays that way.
- We'll spend more trying to repair that old building...
- than it would cost to put up a new one. -It won't cost this town one cent!
- My father donated the building to the town...
- and I will stand the cost of the pipes or the plumbing...
- or whatever it is that's necessary.
- It's my duty, and I will not shirk it.
- And I suppose there's not one of you out there that has the gumption...
- to stand up and say what you think, is there?
- What about you, Reverend? You're a man of influence in this community.
-  What do you think? - No! No, no, I-I, uh--
- I-I never take sides in these matters.
- That's comfortable. Ben?
- Speak up. Come on.
- Oh, Karl!
- Charlie, what do you say?
- Well, say something! Anybody!
- We do have other business to discuss.
-  That is, if you've finished, Karl. - Oh, yes, I've finished!
- There's your whole town council and your whole civic conscience!
- And you certainly don't need me as mayor around here as long as...
- you've got Polly Harrington running everything.
- Karl never changes, does he?
- Uh, ladies and gentlemen, we're having a little light lunch.
- Suppose we stop for a while and have a bite.
- If you ask me, Reverend Ford should have taken sides with Mayor Warren.
- He had the chance, and what'd he do? He says he never takes sides in these matters.
- Oh, stop stickin' your nose into their business and get these sherbet glasses out there.
-  We're out of spoons. - Well, wash some up. Don't stand there bellyaching to me about it.
- You're in a fine mood, aren't you?
- Pollyanna, I thought you could use this for your room.
- Oh, thank you, Nancy! Oh, it's gorgeous!
- Oh, well, thanks for not spilling the beans about you-know-who.
-  About cousin Fred, you mean? - Mm-hmm. Isn't he handsome?
-  I knew it all the time! - You did? How did you know?
- Well, sure, it was easy! I saw you holding hands under the table.
- If you ladies got nothing better to do...
- than sit there gossipin' and snickerin'--
-  Well, we're just talking, Tilly. - Well, talk on your own time.
-  This sherbet's turning to mush. - All right, all right.
-  Nancy? - Hmm? - You know that man?
-  What man? - The one at the train station.
- The one that was just here.
- Well, what was he to Aunt Polly?
- Well, you might say they used to be friends sort of.
-  You think he's gonna marry Aunt Polly? - Who's gonna marry her?
-  She means Dr Chilton. - Huh!
- Fat chance! Who'd want to marry old pickle-faced Harrington?
- Nancy, are you and George gonna get married?
-  Oh, we hope to someday. - Oh, I am glad.
- I think everyone should be married.
- And maybe when you do marry George...
- Aunt Polly will see how happy you are and she'll be very glad to get married herself then.
- Glad this, glad that! Do you have to be glad about everything?
-  What's the matter with you anyway? - Oh, lay off her, Angie.
-  She's not hurting you. - Oh, the way she goes on.
- Now, that's enough! You heard what she said.
- Stop pickin' on the girl. Now, take that sherbet out and serve it the way you should.
- Go on!
- Well, let's see what your aunt has on the menu for tomorrow.
- Roast chicken. Chicken every Sunday.
- Your aunt has no imagination.
- Oh, I love roast chicken! I'm glad tomorrow's Sunday.
- Yeah. Wait till tomorrow. You won't be so glad.
- Did you ever hear of sour stomach? Well, Sundays around here...
- give folks sour stomach for the whole rest of the week.
-  How come? - Wait till tomorrow.
- You'll find out soon enough.
-  Praise him all creatures
-  Here below
-  Praise him above ye heavenly host
-  Praise Father, Son
-  And Holy Ghost
-  Amen
- Death comes unexpectedly!
- And the god, Jehovah, will execute his vengeance on ye...
- who despise his dying love and trample his benefits underfoot.
- The unconverted soul, the foolish children of man...
- do miserably delude themselves in the false confidence...
- of their own strength and wisdom.
- They trust to nothing but a shadow. But bear testament.
- Death comes unexpectedly!
- Now, you say, "Ah, no. I-I had not intended it to come now.
- I had laid out matters otherwise. I thought my scheme good.
- I intended to take effectual care, but death came unexpectedly...
- like a thief, outwitting me, too quick for me.
- Oh, cursed foolishness, that I had flattered and pleased myself...
- with vain dreams of repentance.
- But sudden destruction caught me up."
- And now he will deal with you.
- Now, the great king of heaven and earth...
- will abolish and annihilate this pride!
- Will crush the hardened wretch of the polluted, infinite abomination...
- and rain on him...
- a deluge of fire and brimstone!
- And where's their strength then?
- Where are the great leviathans who defy God then?
- Where's their courage, these-these-- these-these proud spirits?
- Yes...
- death comes unexpectedly.
- And the dread judge has the key of hell.
- He shuts, and no man opens.
- In hell...
- you will be reserved in chains of darkness forever and ever.
- This place of atonement, of damned souls and misery...
- with nothing to relieve you, no comfort...
- no water for your parched tongues...
- no place to rest or take a breath...
- but the everlasting, infinite convulsions of misery...
- forever...
- and ever and ever!
- Now, Isaiah has warned us...
- on the day of vengeance, the earth shall be laid to waste.
- And the cormorant and the bittern shall possess the land.
- The raven and screech owl shall dwell in it.
-  Don't stare at the orphans, Pollyanna. - And who is man...
- to think he can withstand God's mighty wrath?
- Great mountains cannot stand before this wrath.
- Yea, he can lay the earth to pieces in one moment...
- or shatter the whole universe with one stroke of his fiery sword.
- How dreadful is the state of those who are in daily danger...
- of this great wrath...
- this abyss of death and despair.
- Yet, this is the dismal case...
- of every soul in this congregation who has not been born again...
- however moral or strict, sober and religious you may otherwise be.
- There is no security for the wicked...
- because there are no visible signs of death at hand!
- Unconverted men...
- walk over the pit of hell on a rotten covering.
- And there are innumerable places on this covering so weak...
- they will not bear their weight.
- And these places cannot be seen. The arrows of death fly...
- unseen as noonday.
- God has many different unsearchable ways of taking the wicked from this world.
- Who here, in this congregation, listening to this discourse...
- will soon be visited by this covenant of darkness?
- There you are, sitting there...
- calm in your knowledge of health, secure in your well-being.
- Yet who could suffer the agonies of the damned of tomorrow?
- Yes, even today or maybe the next hour...
- the next minute.
- And if we were to know which of you it was...
- what an awful sight it would be.
- A soul doomed...
- to the everlasting bottomless pit of a divine wrath!
- Yes...
- death comes unexpectedly!
- Amen.
- Exactly!
- I thought the reference to Jeremiah at the finish was very effective.
-  Didn't you, Mrs Ford? - Yes.
- I, uh, sometimes wonder whether it's necessary...
- to talk so furiously at them though.
- Dear, Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel...
- were all recorded with flaming pens and fire.
- I-I can't deliver the message with syrup.
- Of course not. Your voice is God's instrument.
-  It should be used accordingly. - Well, we try our best.
- What'd I tell ya?
- He sure sermonizes something fierce, doesn't he?
- Brimstone and damnation on top of ham and eggs!
-  The one day a week we have off. - I hate Sundays.
-  Ooh, I just hate them. - Breakfast still a hot ball in our stomachs...
- and him chewing our ears off from that pulpit!
- We're gonna have roast chicken though. I'm glad of that.
- Are you gonna start that all over again? Glad this, glad that!
- What is all this "glad" business you talk about?
- Oh, just a game I play.
- What kind of a game?
- A game my father taught me.
-  It helps sometimes. - Helps what?
- When things aren't going so well.
-  That reverend! - Away from the peas. Go away.
- Folks just hate the coming of Sunday because of him.
- Do you know why I hate Sunday?
- Because it means the starting of another week.
- That's true. -That's when you can play the glad game.
- Here it comes.
- Miss Goody Two-Shoes is gonna find something about Sunday to be glad about!
-  Oh, lay off her, Angie. - Oh, stop it!
- If you knew how to play the game, then you could find something to be glad about too.
- But you don't!
- All right, Miss Smartie-Pants, what's so good about Sunday?
-  Well, there's always something. - Huh!
- You could be glad because--
- Well, because what?
- Because it will be six whole days before Sunday comes around again, huh?
- That kid.
- Hi.
- Why don't you come out of the front door like normal people?
- They won't let us. I can come out anytime I want with my tree.
- You can also fall and hurt yourself badly. You shouldn't play in trees.
- That's stupid. Don't you believe in God?
- Of course I do! But what's that got to do with it?
- He grew it there, didn't he, so I could climb out anytime I want.
- You're much too young to go around discussing things you don't know anything about.
- He did too! Why else would it be there?
- Shows you're very juvenile.
- You aren't so much, you girl!
- Besides, I'm somethin' you can't be.
- I'm an orphan.
- Go away from me, please, little boy.
- "Go away from me, please, little boy."
- What is it you want?
- I wanna go fishin'. You wanna come along?
- Aren't you supposed to use a hook?
- I don't have a hook.
- Oh.
- Hello.
-  Well, look who's here. How are you? - Fine, thank you.
-  Caught anything? - Not yet.
- What was it you and my Aunt Polly fought about?
- Now, where did you hear about that?
- Oh, just around. But they won't discuss it when I'm there.
- Um, would you mind telling me what it was?
- Well, Pollyanna, it's a strange thing about arguments.
- At the time, they seem very important. But now--
- You know, I can't even remember what it was about.
- Huh.
- Aunt Polly's very pretty.
- Yes, I think she is, don't you?
- Yes. I just said so.
- I love her, but I don't love the way she fixes her hair.
- Years ago, she used to wear it long and soft down to her shoulders.
- It was very soft.
- It must've been beautiful.
- Yes, it was very beautiful.
- Did you used to be in love with her?
- Come on, Pollyanna. Let's go!
- Reverend Ford and his wife are with Aunt Polly now.
- But they'll-- they'll be leaving soon.
- I suppose Aunt Polly will be alone by herself most of the afternoon.
- Well, I-I'd better be going now.
- Good-bye.
-  You wanna know something? - What?
- Trees are the best things in the world.
- You can hide up in 'em and people don't even know where you are.
-  And they're walking right beneath you. - I never thought much about it.
- Well, they are. You wanna see something?
-  What? - Come on. I'll show ya.
-  It says, "Keep out." - Shh! Ya gotta keep quiet.
-  Ya see that place? - What about it?
- That's Old Man Pendergast's place.
- He's the meanest man in town!
-  Well, what are we doing here? - Shh! Keep quiet.
- Come on, Pollyanna.
- This is his old, wet basement with rats in it.
- He hates kids. If he catches ya...
- he throws ya down in his basement and keeps ya for his slave.
-  Then what are we doing here? - Because I wanna show ya something.
- There it is.
- Up there.
- The best climbing tree in town!
- Isn't it a beauty?
- Why, of all the stupid little juvenile tricks!
- Do you mean to tell me that you brought me all the way up here...
- just to see a crummy old-- a crummy old tree?
- Wait a minute, Pollyanna. Don't you even want to climb it?
-  No. - Well, would ya give me a boost?
- Aw, come on. Please?
- All right.
- All right. Up this way. More. Come on. Higher.
- A little bit higher. Just a little bit more.
- A little bit higher. Right--
- Right there.
-  What are you doing here? - Look out!
- I've gotcha!
-  Oh, you little--  Lemme go!
-  I've got you, you little devil. Come back here, you little girl! - Lemme go!
- Come back here! You wicked little boy. I'm gonna get the constable this time.
-  Lemme go, lemme go! - Shut up! I'll teach you.
-  Lemme go! - I'll teach you a lesson you won't forget. Come here.
-  Lemme go. - Come on! Get up there!
- Lemme go!
- I want you children to understand that I do not want you on my property.
-  Keep away from me. Lemme go. - Hey! Listen to me! - You big bully, lemme go!
-  I've told you  times to keep out of that tree! - Lemme go!
- And I don't want you in the tree. You hear me?
- You keep away from me. I wasn't hurtin' anything.
- It doesn't make any difference what you were doing. I'm gonna call the constable this time...
-  and see that you keep off my property. - Lemme go! - That's all there is to it, you hear me?
- Stop it! Stop it, you mean old man.
-  You let him go immediately! - Oh!
- You came back, did you? Who are you?
- My Aunt Polly will send for the police.
- And they'll find us in your old rat-filled basement and you'll go to jail.
- Oh. Oh, they know about me, do they?
- Everything! All about the children you've kidnapped and turned into your slaves.
-  Serves 'em right for trespassing on my property. - We weren't hurting anything.
- We just wanna climb your old tree.
- You fall out of that tree and get hurt and I get sued by your parents.
- I don't got any parents. I'm an orphan.
- Well, before I pitch you into the basement with the others...
-  what name do you go by, boy? -Jimmy Bean.
- Jimmy Bean. I like to keep a record of your names, you see,Jimmy...
- so that I can tell you from the rats down there in the basement.
-  You lemme go! - Hey! Come back here, doggone you!
- Oh, no you don't. No, you don't. You come back here.
- What am I going to do with you, huh?
- I don't know, sir.
- Well, it was getting too crowded with kids in that basement anyway.
- All right. I'll let you go this time...
- but you've got to promise never to come bothering me here again.
-  You promise? - Yes, sir.
- Cross your heart and hope to die?
- All right. Get out. Get out!
- Go on. What are you waiting for?
-  You know what I think? - No.
- What do you think?
- I don't think there's any kids in your old basement.
-  I think you're just a big bluff! - Oh, you do, do you?
- Well, put that down! What are you doing touching things?
- Don't touch anything. These are my things and I don't want them touched.
- It just looks like a lotta old dusty junk to me.
- Well, you wouldn't know anything about that anyway.
- You're nothing but a child.
- Imagine criticizing a beautiful antique of this kind.
-  Never heard of such a thing. - How'd you do that? - What? What? What are you talking about?
- That. How do you make it?
- Don't you know anything? I didn't make it. The sun made it.
-  That's prismatic reflected light. - Where from?
- Where from? Well, uh--
- Oh, from here.
-  You see these hanging crystals? - Mm-hmm.
- The sun's rays hit it, and it acts like a prism. You understand?
-  Sure I understand. - You do not.
- You don't know what a prism is. Now, admit it.
- It makes a rainbow right on your wall. Isn't it beautiful?
- Yes, but when the sun sets, it'll be gone. So stop carrying on so.
- Sure, but it'll be back again tomorrow when the sun comes again.
-  You have to admit that. - I don't have to admit anything!
- Well, I better be going back home now.
- Well, goodbye, Mr Pendergast. It was very nice meeting you.
- And thank you for showing me your house.
- But I didn't show you my house. You came barging in here!
- Goodbye.
- Kids. Kids today.
- Well, you always were unpredictable, Edmond.
-  Hello, Polly. - Coming here like this without even calling.
- Uh, won't you sit down?
-  Could I get you some sherry? - Uh, no, thank you.
- I ran into your niece down at Wompus Creek.
- We were talking about you and I thought, why not stop by and say hello.
- Why, that's very nice. I don't know why Pollyanna would be at Wompus Creek.
- Oh, she was playing.
- She told me you'd be alone today.
- There were so many people around the other day, we hardly had a chance to talk.
- Yes, well, I'm sorry that meeting got out of hand like that.
- Well, tell me, who have you seen since you've been back? - No one.
-  You knew that Carleen Donnelly got married, didn't you? - No.
-  You remember her brother, Beckett Donnelly? - No.
- Of course you do. You two used to argue all the time.
- Well, I'm sorry, I don't.
- Well, it really wasn't that important.
- I know what I'll do. I'll give you a welcoming home party.
- It might be nice to see some of the old faces again.
- I know that Gary and Nell would love to see you.
- Do you know that Nell has eight children? And I think it's the fifth one--
-  Polly? - What?
- I'm not very good at parties. Please don't.
- Well, I just thought you might like to see some of your friends.
- I came back to see you.
- Well, that's very flattering.
- A busy person like you remembering me.
- I came back to see if you were married and what had happened to you.
- Oh, I'm just the same.
-  Nothing has changed. Everything is--  We made a mistake.
- I came back to see if you felt the same as I do.
- Oh, but it's been five years.
-  You can't just pop out--  They were wasted years.
- Tell me about your work, Edmond.
- We've heard that you've opened a clinic in Baltimore...
- and we're very proud of you.
-  What was it you mentioned yesterday about the orphanage? - I don't remember.
- Oh, yes, you do. It was something about the dispensary.
- It's inadequate for that number of children. That's all.
- Well, I want to modernize it. Will you help us?
- Just tell us what we need and I'll buy it.
- It's a civic responsibility. Why should you buy it?
-  Well, it isn't as if I couldn't afford it. - What does that have to do with it?
- Well, it's because I want to. I feel I should.
- After all, there is an obligation to having wealth.
- Haven't you learned yet that people don't like false charity?
- Well, I don't want to talk about it any more. I don't know how we got off on this subject.
- Well, it isn't the way I wanted it.
-  Perhaps I should come again another time. - Yes, perhaps you should.
- And maybe you should call first?
- Yes, I'll do that.
- Pollyanna, look at your new dress.
- It's filthy! And your shoes!
- Oh, I'm sorry, Aunt Polly.
- I was playing, and I didn't realise.
- What were you and Dr Chilton talking about?
- Oh! Nothing.
- We were talking about your hair.
-  My hair? - Yes.
- He said you used to wear it very long and soft, down to your shoulders.
- He said it was beautiful!
- Yes, well, uh-- Clean yourself up for supper, dear.
- Yes, Aunt Polly.
- Here is the last of the calf's-foot jelly.
-  Oh, but Aunt Polly, please--  There'll be no nonsense about it, Pollyanna.
- This is a duty and a job that must be done.
- Nancy will show you where the deliveries are supposed to be made.
-  What kind of deliveries? - Charity baskets, child.
-  Oh, the suffering in this world! - Dwell on it.
- Appreciate how lucky you are.
- Now, these two go first, Nancy, and handle them with care.
-  Where's the one for Mrs Snow? - Oh.
-  We took great pains to wrap that attractively, knowing how she is. - Yes, ma'am.
- And there'll be no dawdling. And keep your clothes clean for a change.
- Come on. Off with you.
-  Come on, honey. We've got three more to go! - Oh, just a minute, Nancy.
- What's in the durn thing?
- Um, I think that one's calfs'-foot jelly.
- Oh, you don't have to look at it as though it was charity...
- just a gift from one friend to another.
-  Friend? - Yes. I'm your friend.
- Well, uh, I better be going now. Goodbye.
-  People sure hate to get charity. - Isn't it the truth?
-  And I don't blame them. - Do-gooders! Ha!
-  Goodbye, Miss Ferd. - Goodbye.
-  Now, how does that go again? - Uh--
-  Early one morning just as the sun was rising
-  Early one morning just as the sun was rising
-  I heard a maiden singing in the valley below
- One up.
-  - Early one morning -Just as the sun was rising
-  I heard a maiden singing
- That takes care of Mrs Gaupherson, Miss Neely...
- Doppsils and the Ferds.
-  Who's left? -Just this one, Mrs Snow.
-  And I wish this one were over with. - What's wrong with her?
- She's just plain crabby, that's what's wrong with her.
- You never met anyone so cantankerous.
- If it was Friday, she'd wish it was Tuesday.
-  What'd we bring her today? - Uh, calfs'-foot jelly.
- You wait and see. She's bound to wish she had chicken.
- And if we brought her chicken, she'd want lamb broth.
- She's just cantankerous!
- Millie?
- Nancy, come on in.
-  How are you? - Hello, there.
-  Hello. - Uh, this is Pollyanna Whittier.
- Oh, sure. I heard you were coming to stay with your aunt.
-  And this is Mrs Snow's daughter, Mildred. - How do you do?
-  How do you do? - Where were you last night? We waited and waited.
- At the hayride. I know. My mother said I could go and at the last minute changed her mind.
-  She had some kind of, I don't know, an upset stomach. - Oh, what a shame.
- Stop that noise in there! Haven't you any respect for a dying woman?
- Honestly! She was so crotchety today. I'm just worn to a frazzle!
- This morning I-I fixed her a cup of coffee, as usual.
- You know, I brought it in. She didn't want coffee this morning.
-  This morning she wanted tea. - I don't know how you stand it. I swear!
- I don't know either. I poured it down the sink. I had to make her a new cup of tea.
- Do you remember the day that-that-that I brought the currant jelly?
- Yes! -I had currant jelly from here to there.
- She threw it at you!
- Hello.
- Who are you?
- And what are you doing in my bedroom?
-  Uh, I am Pollyanna Whittier. - Who?
-  Miss Harrington's niece. - Oh!
-  The ladies' aid has sent me with this. - Hmm? What is it?
-  Calfs'-foot jelly. - Calfs'-foot jelly! Oh!
- And I had my heart set on lamb's broth today.
-  You mean chicken, don't you? - What's that?
- Well, they tell me you always wanted chicken when you were brought jelly.
- You're a Miss Impertinence, aren't ya?
- Come here. Come right over here.
- You have a stubby little nose.
- What do you think about that?
- I know it. I wish I were pretty like you.
- Oh, don't you try to butter me up.
-  I'm not at all pretty. - Oh, but you are!
- And you don't look sick at all.
- Well, that shows you what a stupid little girl you are.
- Well, get outta my way.
- Why, I'm right on death's doorstep...
- just hanging on by sheer will power.
- If you had to lay here day after day and day after day, and you call anybody, and your daughter--
- Put that down, stop it. And she wouldn't come.
- She's gallivantin' somewhere. And the doctor, all he gives you is pills.
- Pills and bills. Just pills and bills. That's all.
-  What are you staring at? - Your prisms.
-  My what? - Your prisms.
-  Did you know they paint rainbows on your wall? - Oh.
- See? On that wall over there.
- How'd you do that?
-  Well,I said that I'm too old and too smart for that old saw, Fred Pallegrew. - Well, I should say so!
- You just turn that horse around and head out from underneath this covered bridge right now.
-  I'll bet that cooled his heels. - You should've seen his face.
-  More coffee? - Oh, please.
-  It's awful quiet in there. - I wonder what's going on.
- Uh, more to your left. To your left, you silly girl.
- What's the matter with you? Now, there. There. That's not bad at all.
- Not bad? It's gorgeous!
-  I think it was a fine idea. - Now, don't be taking credit.
- I suggested stringing them up there.
- Why, Mrs Snow, that's a fib. It was my idea.
- It was my idea to use the string!
- You didn't know how to do it till I suggested the string.
- You're impertinent. I don't like you at all.
- I'm sorry.
- When are you coming back again?
- Tomorrow, I guess. I'll see you then.
- Well, if I'm not in my grave.
-  Bye. - Bye.
- All right, Nancy?
-  Goodbye, Millie. - Goodbye, Nancy.
-  Goodbye, Pollyanna! - Bye.
- Don't stand there! Go on and fix a cold pack for my headache!
- Go on! Go on!
- Yes, Mother.
- Let's get some gumption around here.
- Let's start acting like a community.
- Hey, Doc, you just sit there chewing on that straw.
- Put in your two bits' worth. What do you think?
- I came here to fish, Charlie. I don't want to butt into your affairs here.
- Ben Tarbell? Where are you sneaking off to?
- You folks are biting off a pretty big chew with all this talk.
- Come on, Ben. Get it said.
- A lot of us have got vested interests in the Harrington companies.
- Our wives belong to her ladies' aid group.
- My woman would skin me alive if I was to go opposite to Polly Harrington.
- And that's the truth! I'm sorry.
- Anybody else want to quit, do it now.
- All right, then. Let's get our hands out of our hip pockets...
- and find a way to raise some money.
-  Are you with me? - Yeah.
-  Early one morning just as the sun was rising
-  I heard a maiden singing in the valley below
- What's happening?
- Now, that's the very first thing in the morning. Charlie Gorman...
- that means eight men assigned to you for carpentry.
-  Dan Seymour'll supply the one-by-twelves. Right, Dan? - Right.
- All right. Now, look, Mary, you gotta get that cooking done.
-  Of course, you got that other thing to run. - Yes, Karl, I'll take care of the chicken.
-  Hi, Pollyanna! - Hi. I'll be back in a minute.
-  Hi, honey. - Hi. What's going on?
- Lady, you are looking at the elected head of the entertainment committee.
- Old Uncle George!
-  Entertainment committee for what? - Well--
- If we get the corn, you can take that whole thing out of there.
- Charlie, you can count on me to haul in that lumber.
-  Don't have to use the big truck--  We're gonna have the best bazaar you've ever seen.
- We sure are!
-  A bazaar? - To raise money for a new orphanage.
- It's the first time folks have stood together against Polly Harrington.
-  Nancy, did you know there's going to be a bazaar? - Yes!
- With corn on the cob and ice cream and everything!
-  Can kids come, George? Can they come? - Well, of course they--
- George? Now, where'd you get that name? -Oh, stop. She's known it all along.
- And you mean you didn't tell your aunt?
-  Well, what did you think I was, a snitch-baby? - You're a good girl.
-  When's it gonna be? - Sunday night, a week.
- Let me tell you about it. What a night. An extravaganza.
- And I'm in charge of all the acts, all the entertainment.
- Picture it, ladies. Darkness, and out of the night...
-  bicycles appear, moving down the square.
- And hanging from their handlebars...
- Two hundred, two hundred gorgeous Japanese lanterns.
- Hey, Pollyanna, wait for me.
-  Where are you goin'? - There's a big bazaar and I'm helping.
- Hey, wait a minute.
-  What's it for? - It's an extravaganza.
- Picture it.
- Darkness...
- fifty bicycles...
-  gorgeous Japanese lanterns swinging.
- And I'll be on the lead bicycle, just riding along, right out in front.
-  Oh, boy. Can I help? - All right. Come on.
-  Where you goin' now? - Mr Pendergast's.
- You're going back? You're nutty!
-  What are you doing back here? - Oh, just came to say hello.
-  Tell you something about your prisms. - Well, what about them?
- Well, aren't you going to invite me in? -Invite you in?
- No more privacy than a goldfish.
- All right. Come in, come in. But you can't stay long.
- Can he come in too?
-  Can who come in? -Jimmy Bean!
- Come on. Don't be a scare-baby!
- Oh, come on!
- Don't touch anything.
- Well, why didn't you just invite the whole town while you were at it?
- Oh, I just wanted to show Jimmy the rainbow on your wall.
- Do you mind?
- All right. Go ahead, go ahead.
- Kids-- They'll drive you crazy.
- One thing or another. It's getting so a man...
- can't call his home his own any more.
- And where do you think it comes from? Through this piece of glass.
-  Explain it to him, Mr Pendergast. - I've got work to do.
-  Don't you know anything about refracted light, there, boy? - It's the sunlight coming through--
- I'll do the explaining if you don't mind, little Miss Know-it-all.
- Now, boy, you see here, the--
-  Don't they ever cut your hair in that darn orphanage? - I like it the way it is.
- Look at you. So much hair, you look like you're wearing a coonskin cap.
-  Lemme go, will ya? - Anyway...
- about the refracted light.
- Oh yes.
- Now pay attention, boy.
- You see the shape of this crystal? That is a prism.
- The light is stripped by that angle. That refracts the ray...
- splits the colours, diffuses them in an oblique angle...
- and bends it out into a dispersed colour band.
- You understand?
- What he means is...
- the sun comes through here and paints a rainbow.
-  You see? - Oh, I understand!
- Can I try it once, please?
- Go ahead, but don't break anything.
- Do you know Mrs Snow? Well, I've just come from her place.
- And we strung a whole bunch of them up across her window.
- You should see what that does!
-  Let's try it. - All right.
- Oh no, I've got work to do.
- If we had some wire or a piece of thread...
- we could string 'em up across the whole window.
- Oh, we could, could we? Do you kids think...
- I've got nothing better to do than to play silly games?
- Well, don't stand there looking at me like that.
- There's string in that box over there. Go and get it, go and get it.
- Oh, dear, dear, dear.
- Oh, my goodness! Look!
-  Look. See over here? - Look on the door!
-  It's on the door. Can't you see? - Look!
- Oh, it's gorgeous!
- It's the most beautiful room in the entire world.
- Not bad, is it?
- It's not bad at all.
- That dining room looks awfully gloomy. Why don't we do the same thing in there?
-  Oh, boy! Let's go! - No.
- What do you mean, "no"? I thought you enjoyed it.
- Well, it's what I came to see you about, Mr Pendergast.
- You see, they're having a big bazaar in town...
- and they're trying to raise enough money to build a new orphanage.
-  I like the old one. - Be still.
- Anyway, they need help.
- And everyone's supposed to bring somebody else. And I want to bring you.
-  What for? - They're having all kinds of stands to sell things--
- hooked rugs, quilts and crocheted tablecloths.
- And we can have a stand and sell these!
- Rainbow makers!
- I'll bet everyone would buy one.
- I never go into town, and I don't believe in community projects.
-  But they need you! - They need me?
- Of course, they are sort of attractive little things, aren't they?
- I just wonder if folks would buy a thing like this.
- I wonder.
- Now, I'm not trying to sell you the brass, but it is durable.
- Well, the silver's pretty, and I think you're right about the brass.
- Oh, I don't know. I just can't make up my mind.
- Of course, the effect of silver is always in good taste.
-  Hi, Mrs Snow. - Well, where have you been, you naughty girl?
-  Oh, I'm sorry. I've been helping for the bazaar. Hello, Mr Murg. - How do you do?
- What've you got there? Don't bring those dirty rags in here! Get them off my bed!
- Oh, they aren't dirty rags. They're patchwork squares. Mrs Gaupherson made them.
- I thought perhaps you'd like to stitch them together...
- to make a patchwork quilt for the bazaar.
-  What an impertinent child! - Listen. You just take them right out of here!
-  I'm not gonna do anything of the sort! - But everyone's helping--
- Mr Neely, the Julians, and even old Mrs Thurm.
- Oh. She wants me to work in my condition.
- Don't bother Mrs Snow, girl.
- She's a very sick woman!
- Well, I thought it might give you something to do instead of just lying around.
- I mean, the bazaar's for an awfully good cause.
- Well, it's a waste of time. Nobody'll come to it. You wait and see.
-  That's right. - Why not?
- Because-- Because of your aunt, that's why not.
- Well, I don't understand.
- Well, we do, don't we, Mr Murg?
-  Indeed we do. - Good. Well.
- Now, about this white satin. I think it's lovely.
-  This-This is my first choice. - And I think the best one.
-  Yeah. - It'll look lovely against the brass handles.
- Are you having a dress made?
- Don't be impertinent!
- I'm pickin' the lining for my coffin.
- That's right.
- But you're not gonna die!
- Does she have to be here?
- Go on into the kitchen and talk to Mildred.
- Now--
- Now, this satin is lovely.
- Well, it's all settled then.
- Thirteen yards of the white satin...
- at one dollar twenty the yard.
- And the brass coffin handles.
- Well, all right, all right. Write it up.
- Stop frowning at me like that!
- What's the matter with you?
- Well, it's just that...
- well, a person shouldn't think about dying so much!
-  I don't want you to die. - Oh, bless you for that.
- It seems everyone else can't wait.
- I'm not supposed to talk about my father at home...
- but I guess it's all right here.
- My father used to say, a person should think about living.
- Why don't you go outside and play?
-  Hush up. I want to hear what she has to say. - Yes. Mrs Snow. Yes.
- It just reminded me about my father and the doll.
- You see, I always wanted a doll...
- but we never had enough money for things like that. My father was a minister.
- But surely he could afford a little thing like a doll.
- Well, he couldn't. We had to have the money for food.
-  Oh, for heaven's sake! - Shh!
- So anyway, my father wrote to the missionary people...
- and asked them to please send a little secondhand doll.
- Well, there was a funny mistake. When the missionary barrels came...
- instead of a doll, they sent a pair of crutches.
- Well, of course, I was rather disappointed.
-  So my father made up the glad game. - The what game?
- She's been pestering folks all over town with this sunshine and happiness thing.
- Hearts and flowers. Enough to make you sick.
-  Hush up! I want to hear it. - Certainly.
- Anyway, about the crutches...
- my father said, "Don't let's be gloomy.
- Let's try to find something to be glad about."
- So we made a game of it-- the glad game!
-  "The glad game"! - Shh!
- So anyway, we played the game...
- and after a while I forgot about the doll and being gloomy.
- And you know what? I found a reason for being glad.
- Well, there's nothing happy about a pair of crutches.
- Well, we were glad that we didn't have to use them!
- Why must you bedevil this poor dying woman...
- with your childish, silly little stories?
- I just thought she could play the game! You could be glad you don't need this horrid old coffin!
- You could help others by making the patchwork quilt for the orphans if you wanted.
- You ought to forget about dying and be glad you're living!
- Oh, I don't care what you do.
- I'm not gonna come and see you any more.
- I-- I didn't mean to hurt her feelings.
-  She's serious about it, isn't she? - Oh, please, please, Mr Murg.
- Leave me alone.
-  I'm sorry if I've--  Please.
- Please leave me alone.
- Ben told me yesterday they've been organizing, about  of them.
-  And Ed Chilton's got a finger in the pie too! - Edmond?
- Gave them the idea is what he did. And that's not all.
-  It couldn't have been Nancy. - I tell you, she was there. Jesse told me.
- I'd fire that girl so fast, it would make her head swim.
- And that child, your own niece, helping them!
- Pollyanna?
- Just a moment.
- Mrs Tarbell tells me you're involved with that bazaar. Well, I won't have it.
- But, Aunt Polly, I'm part of the flag.
- We won't discuss it. I don't want you to see those people any more...
- and that's an order!
- Yes, ma'am.
- The blessings you've heaped on that child, and her working with those people against you.
- Get down my cake tins, Angie. We're going to work.
-  Doin' what? - Thinks she's the queen of Sheba, does she?
- Well, she can't stop us from helping with that bazaar!
- We're gonna bake cakes, dozens and dozens of'em!
-  Where are you gonna get the ingredients? - Where do you think?
-  You're getting paid, aren't you? - Not to be kicked. He kicked me in the stomach.
- Now,Jimmy, you've got to stop kicking Mr Hooper and sit still.
-  I don't want to get my hair cut! - Hey,Jed.
- Get that hammer out back, and we'll nail his shoes to the chair!
-  Hey. - Mr Pendergast.
- You should be ashamed of yourself, Ben Tarbell!
- I paid for the tickets. Will you let it go at that, Karl? I just can't show up at your affair.
-  You ain't the only one, Ben. - What do you mean by that?
- Well, I just came from your newspaper office. What's the matter with those fellows?
- They said they couldn't handle this ad for our bazaar. Will you go over and straighten them out?
- Ah, take it easy, Doc. Our space is all sold, and I can't go around--
- Tell him the truth. Why lie to the man? You're a coward!
- It isn't Baltimore up here, Doc. This is a small town.
- And you know as well as everybody else our newspaper's owned by the Harrington family.
- Liver-bellied bunch of miserable sheep! That's what you all are.
- Well, take it easy, Pendergast. It's the way things are.
- I say that you're all chicken-livered! And I'm sick and tired of--
- Just a minute!Just a minute! The thing is this.
- Most folks around here make a living outta Polly Harrington, some way or another.
-  We can't afford to antagonize her. - Can't afford to antagonize her?
- Just don't be surprised if come Sunday night nobody shows up at your bazaar.
- I don't believe that.
- Well, you're comin', aren't ya? Claire? Charlie?
- People are just plain scared to, Karl.
- They're afraid of Polly Harrington paying 'em back later.
-  She'll do it too. You know her. - Now, look.
- We've all taken a cut or two at the Harringtons...
- but she wouldn't do a thing like that.
-  If you think I'm intimidating a whole town--  Oh, Polly, you know what I mean.
- No one will make a move in this town without the Harrington stamp of approval on it.
- Oh!
- Karl Warren sent you, didn't he? He knew no one would cooperate without me.
- Nobody sent me. I just wanted it made clear you don't mind if the others cooperate.
- You needed my help. Why don't you admit it?
- Won't let your guard down for a minute, will you?
- Still suspicious. Still don't trust anyone.
- Nothing's changed, has it, Polly?
- You're still as opinionated as ever, if that's what you mean.
- Oh, Angelica...
- Dr Chilton is leaving.
- Keep busy, Polly. Lots of meetings and civic duties and obligations.
- It's a poor substitute for what's really wrong with you.
- I knew I could count on you for some lofty clinical observations.
- Would you like to be paid for your diagnosis?
- This one's on the house. There's no medical term for it.
- You can give everything but love. It's as simple as that.
-  Angelica? - Ma'am?
- See that the flowers in the conservatory get fresh water.
-  I found them dry again today. - Yes, ma'am.
- Did ya hear how he told her off?
- Like water off a duck's back to her.
- That woman's got no feelings at all!
-  How'd it go, Ed? - Stubborn, mule-headed woman.Just like her father. I should have known better.
-  What did she say? - A lot of foolish nonsense.
- What she really wants is for us to go begging to her...
- get her sanction, permission from the queen to gather in the streets.
-  Hi, Nancy. - Hi, dear. - What's the matter?
-  Oh, nothing. - It's a doggone shame, after all the work folks put into it.
-  Is the bazaar off? - It looks that way.
-  Why? - You wouldn't understand.
-  Is it because of Aunt Polly? - Yes.
- It takes a word from someone, someone who isn't under her thumb.
- Fat change you got, Ed. She's got her finger in nearly everything--
- the bank, the mills, the paper, real estate.
- Harrington Town. A fine thing, one woman owning a town.
- Well, like it or not, that's what she does.
-  Nancy. - Yes? - She doesn't own the church.
- That's right.
- What did you say?
- Um, I just said that nobody could own a church.
- Our social structure in this small town seems to teeter on a delicate balance...
- one which-- which I certainly cannot in any way attempt to influence.
- A-A man of God cannot be taking sides in these feuds.
-  But all we want is a word from you, Reverend. - No.
-  If you'd just let the people know tomorrow you're in favour of us. - No, no, no.
- I won't use that pulpit for public announcements.
-  Then you're siding with her by not mentioning it. - I am not!
- I'm staying completely out of it, and that's all there is to it.
- Reverend Ford, if you'd just let us say that you're in favour.
- There's nothing more to discuss.
-  This is all just impossible. - I'm afraid you're right.
- Thank you, Reverend Ford.
- You see, I-- Of course, you understand that--
- Personally I think it's a good cause and all that, and-and I wish you luck with it.
- Thanks a lot. I guess Pollyanna was wrong.
- Now, what has she got to do with this?
- She said nobody could own a church.
-  Hello, Mrs Ford. - Hello, dear. What are you doing here?
- Aunt Polly sent me. Uh, something for Reverend Ford.
-  Oh, he's just back up there. - Oh, yes, I saw him. Thank you.
-  It's a lovely day, isn't it? - Yes, it is.
- And he sayeth unto them...
- the wicked shall be punished.
- The wicked shall be punished.
- Their poison is like the poison of serpents.
- But they shall feel the gall of asps within them.
- How many times have I stood on this pulpit...
- and warned you, cautioned you again and again--
- A house divided against itself cannot stand.
- A kingdom divided against itself can be brought to desolation.
- If you are an enemy to one another...
- then you are an enemy to God!
- Am I reaching out to you? Do you understand my words?
- Well--
- Week after week, I stand here reaching out to you...
- begging you to understand.
- Yet, week after week...
- the same wickedness persists...
- the same dissension...
- the same belligerence, the same feuding...
- until you are ten thousand times...
- more abominable in the eyes of God...
- than the most hateful, venomous, violent, vicious--
- You!
-  What are you doing here? - Oh, nothing.
- Um, I mean, I was looking for you.
- Uh, Aunt Polly sent you this.
-  Now, what is it? - Uh, I don't know.
- I'm sorry I disturbed your practise.
-  Would you like someone to practise your sermon on? - No. No, thank you, child.
- Uh, Mother and I used to be an audience to my father...
- when he was practising his sermons.
-  He-He was a minister too, you know. - Oh, yes, yes. So he was.
- Uh, do you like being a minister?
- Do I like being a m--
- Now, why would you ask a thing like that?
- Oh, the way you looked just then reminded me of my father.
- Once I saw him sorta sad like that, and I asked him.
- And what did he say?
- Oh. Oh, said he was glad he was.
- But it made him sad sometimes.
- Just couldn't seem to get through to his congregation.
- Sounds familiar.
- I suppose every minister of God faces the same problem.
- Mm, I suppose.
- Tell me, did your father ever solve the problem?
- Well, he read something one day that he said helped him.
- In the Bible?
- No, just something he read someplace.
- He had it put on this chain.
- He wore it always. It's all I have of his.
- "When you look for the bad--"
- Ooh! It always makes me cross-eyed.
- May I?
- "When you look for the bad in mankind expecting to find it...
- you surely will.
-  Abraham Lincoln." - He was the president.
- Yes. Yes, I know.
- But I never heard that before.
- Neither had my father.
- Anyway, he said it started him thinking.
- And from then on, he was gonna look for the good in people.
- That's when we both started searching the Bible for the texts.
- The texts?
- Yes. You know. My father called them "the glad passages."
- You know, the happy ones like...
- um, uh, "Shout for joy"...
- or "Be glad in the Lord."
- You know, like that. There are eight hundred happy texts. Did you know that?
-  No, I didn't know that. - Yes, well, there are.
- And you know, my father said...
- "If God took the trouble to tell us eight hundred times to be glad and rejoice...
- he must've wanted us to do it."
- Oh, I'd better be going now. I'm sorry I disturbed your practising.
- I'll see you later. Uh, goodbye.
- Goodbye, Reverend Ford.
- "Dear Reverend...
- I've taken the liberty of jotting down a few thoughts...
- and some text from Matthew...
- which I thought you might want to use in your sermon tom--"
- Oh, my God. What have I done?
- What have I done?
- Dear, are you all right?
- Nobody owns a church.
- No one.
- Apocrypha. Ecclesiasticus thirty...
- paragraph twenty two.
- "Gladness of the heart is the life of man."
- This is one of the rejoicing...
- or happy texts.
- Ayoung member of our parish pointed out to me...
- that there are  such happy texts in our Bible.
- Well, she was wrong.
- There are, to be exact...
- eight hundred twenty six.
- I know, because I stayed up most of last night counting them.
- I intend to read one of them every week.
- And that should take us, according to my calculations, through sixteen years...
- if I'm around here that long.
- But I can promise you this. If I am here...
- our visits with God on Sunday are going to be happier...
- and more rejoicing too.
- Eh.
- Now, what I have to say now...
- is very difficult for me.
- But it must be said.
- I look out to you now...
- and realize...
- after four years in this congregation...
- I don't even know you. I look out to you now not as my congregation...
- but as people.
- And I say to myself, how sad it is to have missed those four years...
- four years when we could've been friends.
- I should have been looking for the good in you.
- And I-- I failed you. I--
- And I apologize for this.
- God is forgiving, but it's not God's forgiveness I beg, it is yours.
- I'm-I'm not gonna speak about this any more now. It's a lovely day outside.
- So let's go outside and enjoy this Sunday for a change.
- And while you're out appreciating the sunlight, just...
- give a little thought to who's sending it down to you.
- Eh.
- Oh, stop, please. One more thing, please! Please sit down.
- Please.Just one more thing. I'm sorry.
- There's to be a charity bazaar in the band park tonight.
- It's for a good cause.
- And, um, I want to go on record...
- as being one hundred percent for it.
- So let's all go out there and have ourselves some fun...
- because, um...
- well, if you're not there--
- Let me put it this way.
- If you're not there...
- I'll lam into you something fierce when I get you in here next week!
- And you know I can do it too!
-  Where's Pollyanna? - I don't know. I haven't seen her.
- Be careful when you put those in the car. Don't you smudge that frosting.
- Keep your fingers outta there.
- Nancy? Angelica?
- Where's Pollyanna, please? She's gotta be there.
- It's a big bazaar tonight. Pollyanna's gotta be there, or she'll ruin the flag.
- Well, Pollyanna is too young to be out alone at night.
-  Couldn't you bring her? - No, I could not. Goodnight.
- Gemmenie! Oh!
- Pollyanna!
- What are you doing up here? You'll fall.
- You'll fall and kill yourself, you big silly.
- You gotta come. You'll spoil the flag if you don't show up.
- I can't. Aunt Polly won't let me.
- Come on. She'll never know.
- Don't look down.
-  I don't think I want to try it. - Come on. Gimme your hand.
- I'll help you across.
- Come on. Easy. Easy. Real slow.
- Grab that one. All right. Don't look down.
-  Are you sure it's safe? - I'm sure it's safe.
- It's ripe. It's lovely. There you are, folks.
- The finest watermelon at a penny a slice. You cannot have finer.
- There's your best one. I say, isn't that good? Yes, it is.
-  Here you are, lad. - Thank you very much.
-  There you are. Isn't that fine? - It looks wonderful!
- Hurry, hurry! Hurry, hurry!
-  Hello, Mr Howard. - Reverend Ford, Mrs Ford. Nice to see ya.
-  We have a booth over here. - There you are, sir.
- This beautiful, soon-to-be patented rainbow maker.
- You're going to be very happy with it, sir. Hurry, hurry.
- Right this way, ladies and gentlemen.
-  Well, where in the heck have you been? - Well, we made--
- Well, they're looking for you everywhere. Go and get into your costume now.
- Hurry, hurry! Go on! And,Jimmy, go have some fun for yourself.
-  This way, ladies and gentlemen. - Oh, that looks delicious, Mrs Litner.
- Thank you, Mrs Cleaver. Just pay on the other side.
-  There you go, my dear. - Thank you, Mrs Lagerlof.
- You're very welcome.
- Pollyanna! Will you go and get into your costume? They're waiting for you.
- Now, who do you suppose this is?
-  Mrs Snow! - Here.
- Here. Now, you can take this and raffle it off.
- You finished it. Oh, it's gorgeous.
- Mrs Snow, it's beautiful.
- Hi, Millie. Good evening, Mrs Snow.
- Darling! Listen, honey, you've gotta hurry. They're waiting for you.
-  Uhh, quilt? - Well, I'll take it to the quilt stand.
-  Now you skedaddle as fast as you can and put on your costume. - Here. Hold my cake.
- Run!
- A nice, home-made patchwork quilt. No home is complete without one.
- On the cob. There's some salt over there.
-  Can I have more? - You finish those first, then you can come back and have some more.
- Delicious corn on the cob.
-  One. - Right here.
- Pollyanna, will you hurry up? Everyone else is dressed and waiting for you.
-  But I never get a chance to have anything. - Oh, come on.
- Yes, you'll win yourself a beautiful doll.
- A beautiful doll if ya fish in the fishing pond.
- All right, step right up here, folks. This is the place.
-  I am not going to budge. - I've had just enough of your nonsense.
- You're going to join in with the others and make this a town, not a dynasty.
- Get down out of that car, Amelia. I'm warning you. Move!
-  Good evening, folks. - Come on.
-  Fish and wish for a surprise here, folks. - Here, honey. - Oh, thank you.
-  Yes, sir, folks. - Now, you have to think about what you want and wish very hard.
- I understand.
-  I'm wishing. - Do you know what you want?
- All right.
- Hey, there she goes. The young lady's going down after it.
- What we gonna get there? Come on. Step right in there, folks.
- Fish in the magic fishing pond. Everybody step right up here.
- It's only two cents. Drop a line and fish for your surprise.
- It's the most exciting game at the bazaar.
- Come on, folks. Fish and wish. Get your bamboo pole here.
- Two cents! Hey! Looky there!
-  The little lady just pulled a beautiful doll for herself. - Oh, my gosh! Look!
-  Yes, sir, folks. - She's mine. Oh, how did they know?
-  Right here--  Step right up-- Well, Reverend.
-  Step right up and show 'em how to do it. - No, no. No, no.
-  I haven't pitched since my college days. - Hey, Reverend!
- Bet you couldn't hit the broad side of a barn.
- Who is that? Charley MacAndrews up there?
-  What about it? - Here. Hold this.
- Leave your coat on. You're not gonna hit anything anyhow.
-  Buy some corn with the money. - You know...
- I've been trying to get you baptised for the past three years.
- And he throws!
- Look out! Look out! Look out!
-  O beautiful for spacious skies
-  For amber waves of grain
-  For purple mountain majesties
-  Above the fruited plain
-  America, America
-  God shed his grace on thee
-  And crown thy good with brotherhood
-  From sea to shining
-  Sea
-  O beautiful for spacious skies
-  For amber waves of grain
-  For purple mountain majesties
-  Above the fruited plain
-  America, America
-  God shed his grace on thee
-  And crown thy good with brotherhood
-  From sea to shining
-  Sea
-  Take you home again, Kathleen
-  Across the ocean
-  Wild and wide
-  Oh! Thank you. - Goodnight. - Goodnight.
-  Goodnight. - Thanks for the ride.
-  Where your heart has ever been
-  Since first you were my bonny bride
-  The roses all have left your cheeks
-  My heart just fades away
-  And dies
-  I'll take you home again
-  Kathleen
- I'd never thought. The way they bought up those cakes!
- It's a lot of money for that.
-  What is it, ma'am? - I thought I heard something.
- Oh, Lord of mercy.
- Oh!
- Oh, Angelica, call the doctor quickly.
- Oh, my God.
- If you don't mind, I'd like to speak to all of you in the salon for a moment.
- Nancy, when Miss Pollyanna feels better...
- I want you to move all of my clothes and my personal belongings into the next room.
-  Yes, ma'am. - I want her to stay where she is.
- It's a larger room, and it has a much nicer view.
- And it looks as though she's going to have to remain there for quite some time.
- You might as well know that Pollyanna's legs are paralyzed.
- She doesn't know it yet, and I don't know exactly how I'm going to tell her.
- I just don't know how I'm going to tell her.
- I came as soon as I heard. Eh, how is the child?
- Pollyanna!
- Come on down and play! Pollyanna!
- We'll go swimmin'. Want to?
-  Pollyanna! - Boy! Boy! Boy, boy.
- Stop that, stop that. Now, you go away from here.
-  But I wanna play with Pollyanna. - Pollyanna can't play, because she's had an accident.
- Now, you go on home like a good boy. Go on. Hurry up. Go on.
- Hurry up. Go on.
-  God works in ways mysterious to man. - Don't speak to me about God!
- Say what you think. I can see it in your eyes.
-  They blame me, don't they? - No. No, nobody's blaming you.
- It's true, isn't it? I could have been the least bit understanding.
- That child lies up there because of me.
-  Polly, the mercy of God is forgiving--  Oh, what kind of a merciful God...
- could allow a thing like this to happen to a child?
- And if he were merciful, why did he let her come to our town?
- Let me tell you something, Polly Harrington.
- Sunday a miracle happened in this town. -Oh, this town!
- Yes, this town. Right out there in that street the people are smiling at one another.
- Go on. Take a look for yourself. It's very contagious.
- Just think, Polly. If she had never come to this town--
- We ought to get down on our knees and thank God for sending her to us.
- Excuse me, ma'am. Dr Chilton wants to see you.
- Now, you understand everything I told you, don't you, dear?
-  And there's nothing to be afraid of. - What is it, Edmond?
- I told Pollyanna about her injury. She understands. Don't you, dear?
- We're going to take you to Baltimore for an operation so you can walk again.
- You hear that, honey?
- I know. Why don't we all cheer up?
- Let's see if we can't find something to be glad about your staying in bed.
- Um, oh, I know.
- This way we can all have steak and ice cream.
- Did you know that your aunt ordered it for you?
- Now you find something to be glad about. We'll play the game.
- Well--
- I suppose I could be glad because--
- Yes? Go ahead, darling.
- No. It was a silly game.
- I hate it.
- I never want to play it again.
- Leave me alone.
- Please try to understand, Pollyanna.
- You're such a part of our lives now.
- Nancy and Angelica, Mrs Lagerlof.
- And I love you as if you were my own little girl.
- Won't you give me that chance? Please?
-  Put these in too, Mr Thomas. - All right.
-  And tell Dr Chilton that the car's all ready. - Yes.
- Yes, we're leaving immediately on the eleven-thirty train.
- Well, check the arrival schedule.
- Make sure we're met with an ambulance. I want complete X rays the minute we arrive.
- Yes. Thank you.
-  Is the operation dangerous? - Yes, it's very delicate.
- You're coming, aren't you? I need your permission to operate.
- Edmond.
- There's something worrying you, and I want to know what it is.
- We can only do so much with surgery. A great deal depends on her.
- This depression she's got herself into. That's what's worrying me.
- Edmond. She's had a shock. She's just learned about her legs.
- I can't have her despondent like this for the operation.
-  Well, you have to give her time. - Time? There is no time.
- I have to move her, get her into the hospital, and I don't like it.
- What that child needs is a good shot in the arm of hope.
- Hope? What she really needed was love.
- And that's something I never gave her.
- We can still give her that love.
- You and I together.
- Ma'am! Ma'am! There's something very peculiar happening outside.
- Miss Harrington! They-They-They'll ruin our flower beds.
-  What are you talking about? - A-A-Across the lawns and the flowers.
- W-We gotta do something. I gotta stop 'em. Gotta get 'em outta there.
-  Now, let me out. - That's what I've been trying to tell you.
- Been trying to tell me what?
- Oh, not the begonias!
- Them's Miss Harrington's favourite flowers.
- Now, please, folks. Go around the other way.
- Don't come through there. You can go around that tree.
- Now look! Go around over by the driveway. I--
- Oh, the heck with it.
-  What is it you want? - We don't want anything.
- We just come to say "How'd ya do" to the child...
- and bring a bit of gladness into her life.
- Like she brought into ours, God love her.
- We just want her to know she's got friends, lots of them.
- Give her our love and we'll get off your private property, Miss Harrington.
- Well, no. Uh, wait.
- Why don't you tell her yourself? Open the doors, Nancy.
- Nancy, open the door.
- Come in, won't you? Nice to see you.
- Hello. How are you, Mr Neely? I'm just fine. How are you today?
- Hello. Won't you come in? Oh, what beautiful flowers.
- Hello. I'm so glad you came. Hello.
- You have a few callers downstairs, young lady.
-  What? - You gonna greet them with that mopey old face of yours?
- I don't wanna see anyone.
- Well, Pollyanna, you're not gonna have much choice in the matter this time.
-  Oh, no, please. I don't wanna see anyone. - Now, just easy.
-  You'll be all right, dear. I know. - You get well now, you hear?
- It's not charity. Just a gift, eh, from one friend to another.
-  Oh, thank you, Mr Neely. - Hi, honey.
- You're going to be fine. Don't you worry.
- Goodbye, darling. We're going to visit you in the hospital.
- Hey, Snookie. Take a look at this, will ya?
- Really? You mean, really? You did it!
-  Oh, Nancy. It's gorgeous. - Isn't it?
- And we're gonna wait for you. You're gonna be my flower girl.
- I'm glad you'll be comin' back to us, darlin'.
- And that's the truth of it.
- The house will be miserable without you.
- Miserable. You hurry back to us.
- Best wishes, Pollyanna.
- Goodbye.
- Goodbye, Angelica.
- Hurry home to us.
- What is everybody sniffin' about? My goodness.
- A bunch of ninnies. Think a person couldn't get well.
-  Hi, Mrs Snow. - Oh, bless you. Bless you, darling.
-  I'll see you soon. - Thank you for coming.
-  Ah, it's all right. Bye. - Goodbye.
-  Hello, Pollyanna. - Hello, dear. We have a surprise for you.
-  Shall we tell her now, Jimmy? - I've been adopted.
-  Adopted? Who? - Who? Who do you think?
- We're gonna spend the rest of our lives just hangin' prisms.
- You hurry home and help.
- Hello, Mrs Ford. Hello, Reverend Ford.
- We looked for the good in them, and we found it, didn't we?
- Aunt Polly?
-  Bye-bye. - Bye. - Bye. Ta-ta.
- Bye-bye. Bye.


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